Conditions You May Not Know That Are Linked To Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis
Osteoporosis
Osteoporosis
Osteoporosis

The condition of osteoporosis, as many may falsely presume is not only related to getting old. The general saying and the science agree that over years, the bone density reduces and it increases the chances of fractures and breakage of the bone, in a condition called osteoporosis. Now it is true that age contributes to the risk, but it isn’t the only factor at play. There are other medical conditions that contribute to the development of osteoporosis in patients.

We will be taking a look at what these conditions that could increase the likelihood of you being diagnosed with osteoporosis are:

Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is linked to a host of illnesses and conditions, with osteoporosis being just one of them. It causes a reduced bone density and a difficulty for the body to reach its optimum bone density. As we grow, the bone packs on density and strengthens as a result. This continues to a point wherein the density is at its peak. Once it reaches the peak, it gradually degrades over the years. If the peak is lower, then the chances for fractures due to a weakened bone is much higher. Further, diabetes is linked to weight issues. More weight you pack on, the more the strain you place on the underlying skeletal system.

IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Diseases)

You must be thinking about what the digestive components in the human body have to do with increasing the likelihood of osteoporosis; we don’t blame you. IBD is described as a group of intestinal disorders that causes swelling of the digestive tract.  This frequent swelling of the intestinal tract causes a disruption in the nutritional absorption (specifically in the case of Calcium, Vitamin D and many other minerals that are linked to bone growth and maintenance). Diseases like Coeliac disease are also responsible for accelerating the ailment of osteoporosis, by preventing the small intestine from absorbing the prior mentioned nutrients correctly.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

This form of arthritis is an example of autoimmune disease; a disease wherein the body’s own immune system attacks healthy tissues in the body. The aftereffect of which is inflammation and chronic joint pain, among many other side effects. Rheumatoid arthritis has no cure and the only course of action is to control and manage the symptoms. The repeated inflammation of the tissue due to this condition causes an acceleration in bone decay or bone loss. As we age, this is inevitable but in the case of those suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, this happens sooner than anticipated.